Category Archives: Killing Fields

Mexican Cartel Extermination Field Found near UNESCO Site

GOMEZ FARIAS, Tamaulipas — Human rights activists searching for cartel victims found an extermination field used by Los Zetas to bury and incinerate at least 500 near a UNESCO-protected ecological biosphere.

The extermination field was found in the southeastern part of Tamaulipas in the rural community of Alfredo Bonfil. The area is close to El Cielo Biosphere, a protected ecological site known as Mexico’s northernmost tropical forest and cloud forest region. Breitbart Texas was able to confirm through Mexican court documents that Los Zetas members confessed to operating multiple incineration sites throughout the border state.

Tamaulipas is one region that has two former governors who are wanted by the U.S. Department of Justice on money laundering charges in connection with cartel bribes. Prosecutors believe that Tomas Yarrington and Eugenio Hernandez received bribes in exchange for protecting criminal organizations. Yarrington is

Read more at: http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/07/25/mexican-cartel-extermination-field-found-near-unesco-site/

Raffle to raise money for suicide awareness – News – Houma Today …

In 2009, Houma resident Titus P. Savoie Jr. said he decided to end his life. 

“I saw in the distance a big butane truck coming down the road at a fast speed and decided right then and there I was going to end everyone’s hurts by simply making that one leap of fate,” Savoie said. “As the truck got closer, I positioned myself to jump out in front of it. As it approached, just as I was about to leap, I changed my mind. I remember getting so mad at myself for backing out and was mad for even thinking about doing something so dumb.” 

Ravaged by conflicting emotions, Savoie said he fell to his knees and screamed in a mixture of anger and relief, comforted only by the internal voices of his mother and friend telling him not to go through with

Read more at: http://www.houmatoday.com/news/20170722/raffle-to-raise-money-for-suicide-awareness

Raffle to raise money for suicide awareness

In 2009, Houma resident Titus P. Savoie Jr. said he decided to end his life. 

“I saw in the distance a big butane truck coming down the road at a fast speed and decided right then and there I was going to end everyone’s hurts by simply making that one leap of fate,” Savoie said. “As the truck got closer, I positioned myself to jump out in front of it. As it approached, just as I was about to leap, I changed my mind. I remember getting so mad at myself for backing out and was mad for even thinking about doing something so dumb.” 

Ravaged by conflicting emotions, Savoie said he fell to his knees and screamed in a mixture of anger and relief, comforted only by the internal voices of his mother and friend telling him not to go through with

Read more at: http://www.houmatoday.com/news/20170722/raffle-to-raise-money-for-suicide-awareness

Avishai’s prophetic ‘Tragedy of Zionism’ was denied by Jewish community 32 years ago

The Tragedy of Zionism
Bernard Avishai
(1985, 359 pp)

Bernard Avishai is a keen observer of the Zionist venture. I know him from his fine writing in the New Yorker, The Nation, the New York Review of Books, and other periodicals. I thought it was high time to take a look at his book length writings.

I start with the Tragedy of Zionism. Avishai has said that when the book was published in 1985, it cost him a tenured position at MIT. Perhaps he anticipated what was coming: he looks out from the back jacket of the book, arms defiantly crossed, looking very Abby Hoffmanesque. But the hysterical response was reactionary. See, e.g. Kirkus (the book is “desperately seeking controversy”). In fact, the book is a wonderfully readable and objective account of Zionism from its origins in the late 19th century, up to the

Read more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2017/07/avishais-prophetic-community/

Today in History – July 26

Today in History for July 26:

On this date:

In 1603, James VI of Scotland was crowned King James I of England. He then authorized an English translation of the Scriptures, first published in 1611 and known since as the King James Version of the Bible.

In 1758, Louisbourg, the great French citadel on Cape Breton Island, surrendered to the British. The fortress capitulated after an eight-week siege by a British force of 27,000 men and 157 ships. With the surrender, the French were driven from the Maritimes.

In 1788, New York became the 11th state to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

In 1805, an earthquake in Naples resulted in 6,000 deaths.

In 1847, the Republic of Liberia was proclaimed. The country had been established in 1822 through the efforts of several American philanthropic societies which wanted to establish freed American slaves in a colony on the West African coast.

In 1852, the first Toronto Stock Exchange was

Read more at: http://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/today-in-history-july-26/wcm/c30e3761-232c-4013-b7ee-6b98ccd3a80a

Exotic cruises

Travel a little farther to experience the exotic sights and sounds of beautiful Halong Bay, the ancient temples of Cambodia or the pagodas of Myanmar on a river cruise.

Many river cruisers take their first voyages close to home in Europe – but soon start looking further afield for more adventurous itineraries.

One of the great lures is a cruise along the Mekong, complete with hotel stays in Cambodia and Vietnam and even an excursion to the beautiful Halong Bay.

Seeing the sun rise above Angkor Wat, being woken by the chimes of a Buddhist temple or taking part in a tai chi class on the top deck is an exciting start to the day. And the transport waiting for your excursion is as likely to be ox carts, tuk tuks or rickshaws as coaches.

During the day you might be blessed by monks, visit local weavers or take a sampan to a floating market. Both Cambodia

Read more at: http://www.worldofcruising.co.uk/exotic-cruises/

Emmanuel Macron And The Post-Revolutionary Idea

PARIS – No, Parisian voters are not “vomitatious,” as the pathetic Henri Guaino proclaimed Monday after losing his seat in the National Assembly. Staying home from the polls, which we have been told for 30 years benefits the National Front, cannot now be used to explain the surge of La République en Marche!, French President Emmanuel Macron’s new political party. And no, Macron is not beginning a dictatorial career at 39, any more than Charles de Gaulle did at 67.

Read more at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/emmanuel-macron-and-the-post-revolutionary-idea_us_594f8203e4b0326c0a8d092b

Tasmania’s Freycinet Experience Walk: ‘Truly one of the greatest experience of your life’

There are spectacular views out over the Freycinet Peninsula.

There are spectacular views out over the Freycinet Peninsula.

The acclaimed British novelist Nicholas Shakespeare describes it as “the only trek”.

“If asked by the right person to nominate one of my favourite spots on earth, I would pause and, in my mind’s eye, take a breath of sea-air from a long deserted beach on the Freycinet Peninsula,” he writes. “I would try and describe a walk on white sand, past an island lagoon flecked with black swans, along a wattle-shaded track impressed by the pawmarks of wombats and devils, to a lodge concealed in the trees.”

Inspired by Shakespeare to reflect upon the same place, I would choose the low-wooded hill behind the lodge where startled echidnas burrow their noses into sand along George’s Walk in Tasmania, Australia. The honey-scents of the flowering

Read more at: http://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/destinations/australia/93927570/tasmanias-freycinet-experience-walk-truly-one-of-the-greatest-experience-of-your-life

Macron and the post-revolutionary idea

No, Parisian voters are not “vomitatious,” as the pathetic Henri Guaino proclaimed Monday after losing his seat in the National Assembly. Staying home from the polls, which we have been told for 30 years benefits the National Front, cannot now be used to explain the surge of La Republique en Marche!, French President Emmanuel Macron’s new political party. And no, Macron is not beginning a dictatorial career at 39, any more than Charles de Gaulle did at 67.

In short, pretty much nothing said about French politics in the last few days explains the apparent landslide that began with the first round of legislative elections on Sunday. And the riot of news since Sunday is so much tinnitus to those who, for years now, have preferred to hear nothing.

So what is happening? How did Macron, a political novice seemingly fated to preside over a thousand and one shaky

Read more at: http://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2017/06/20/commentary/world-commentary/macron-post-revolutionary-idea/